Measuring Tips – features on different surfaces

From time to time, we want to offer measuring tips that show how our machines can simplify the task of measuring parts. Today’s example comes from one of the top 100 window and door manufacturers. They were wanting to verify that the hardware for their doors would fit in the machined areas of the wood parts. Let’s run through the process on our three axis table.

First Surface

Measure at least three points on the top surface to establish a reference frame.
Measure at least three points on the top surface to establish a reference frame.
Probe at least two points along the edge to establish the straight edge of the part on the machine.
Probe at least two points along the edge to establish the straight edge of the part on the machine.
Measure at least three points (we typically do four) on the hole diameter.
Measure at least three points (we typically do four) on the hole diameter.

At this point, we save the reference frame and features associated with it.

Change Probe

Renishaw MH20i Touch Probe
Renishaw MH20i Touch Probe

Using the Renishaw probe, we index the probe head so we can measure the features on the next surface. If the probe has been used in this position before, we start measuring. If not, a quick teach operation tells the machine that the probe has changed.

Second Surface

Measure at least three points on the next surface to establish a reference plane for the features on that surface.
Measure at least three points on the next surface to establish a reference plane for the features on that surface.
Probe at least three points on the arc at one end of the slot.
Probe at least three points on the arc at one end of the slot.
Repeat the process for the arc on the other end of the slot.
Repeat the process for the arc on the other end of the slot.
Create a point by selecting the two arcs. The system creates a midpoint between the two arc centers, which would be the center of the slot.
Create a point by selecting the two arcs. The system creates a midpoint between the two arc centers, which would be the center of the slot.

Checking the Relationship

From here, we can measure a distance between the midpoint we just created, and the center of the hole we probed earlier. The readout will compare those features and tell us in X, Y, and Z how far apart those features are, as well as a 3D straight distance.

Hopefully you find this measuring tip helpful. We’ll be posting more examples like this in the future. If you have an application that you’d like us to help with, fill out our form or send us an email.